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  • Bangladesh the unexplored Holiday Destination

    The small South Asian country of Bangladesh is bursting with hidden treasures that often go unnoticed to the common tourist. DESIblitz is here to guide you through the beauties of Bangladesh.

    Bangladesh

    Bangladesh offers amazing heritage and historical architectural sights.

    Often overlooked by tourists, Bangladesh is really one of the best holiday destinations in Asia.

    Packed with all of the characteristically vibrant sights and sounds of the Indian subcontinent, Bangladesh also offers hidden treasures that will take you far away from the typical tourist traps.

    The best time to visit Bangladesh is November to February. During that time, temperatures hover between 10 and 30 degrees Centigrade and the weather is generally dry. Bangladesh’s rainy season lasts from May until September. Between the wet weather and overwhelming humidity, it’s best to just avoid this period.

    You can easily find midrange hotels for under £8 and nice restaurants for under £1. Like any country, the sky is the limit if you want to go for luxury, and lucky for you Bangladesh can be extremely wallet-friendly. A budget of £10 per day is easy to manage for the average traveller.

    Sundarbans National Park: The Safari of a Lifetime

    Sundarbans National Park

    The vast Sundarbans are spread out over 10,000 sq. km. between India and Bangladesh. This UNESCO World Heritage Site is the world’s largest mangrove forest and home to numerous rare and endangered animals.

    A trip to the Sundarbans is a unique opportunity to see thousands of spotted deer, saltwater crocodile, sharks, primates, and Royal Bengal Tigers.

    Tour the vast region by boat and bicycle to take in the rare, tranquil sights. Before you leave, be sure to go for a fishing expedition and local cooking class.

    Peace and Quiet at Bangladesh’s World Class Beaches

    Bangladesh Beaches

    Cox’s Bazar is said to be the world’s largest natural sandy beach. This Bangladeshi tourist paradise has a 125 km long uninterrupted stretch of sand. While it’s a local hotspot, the beach’s vast size swallows up the other tourists and leaves you with a quiet place to lie in the sand and take in the breathtaking sunsets.

    There are different places on Cox’s Bazar for different kinds of travellers. Go to Laboni Beach for souvenir shopping and great Bangladeshi food. For something quieter, travel another 35 km down the sand to Enani Beach.

    It’s a lovely swimming spot and you’ll feel like you’ve found your own private island. If you’re looking for an adventure, visit Himchari. Trek up the hillside there for amazing sea views and a peak at the famous waterfall.

    If you’re looking for a true tropical paradise, leave the mainland and head to Saint Martin’s Island. The tiny island is truly a place to get away from it all. Bangladesh’s only coral island is surrounded by crystal clear water and feels a world away from the loud life of the city.

    Exploring the World of Tea in Surma Valley

    Surma Valley

    The picturesque rolling hills of Surma Valley are home to lush forests and the producers of some of the world’s greatest tea.

    Tour the historic relics of British plantations there and get a glimpse into the fascinating local tea traditions. The tea gardens extend as far as the eye can see and the delicious aroma engulfs the air.

    If you like bicycling, Surma Valley is truly one of the greatest places in the subcontinent. You can travel for hours and it’s only you, your bike, and the lush, green landscape.

    Bangladesh’s Best Form of Travel

    Bangladesh Travel

    Bangladesh is home to more than 700 rivers and the view from them will completely change your perspective of the tiny nation. Take a small paddle boat for the afternoon or spend ten days on a luxurious tourist ship.

    Whichever you prefer, you must spend some time on the water in Bangladesh. Stop in the villages, shop the markets, swim in the gorgeous waterways, and take in the true culture of the nation.

    Start your journey in Dhaka city then float down the river until the urban landscape becomes a distant memory. Spend the afternoon fishing or just taking in the scenery.

    If you only go for a few hours, be sure to book a sunrise or sunset cruise. The view over the calm waters in unparalleled. Full day tours are available for £30 or less.

    Dhaka: The Hidden Charms of the Covered City

    Dhaka

    Everything that you have heard about Dhaka is true. The massive city is home to more than 18 million people.

    Conservative estimates say that there are at least 400,000 auto rickshaws clogging up the roads and creating some of the world’s worst traffic. Let that keep you off the roads but don’t let it stop you from visiting Dhaka. Come to take in the life, colour, and discord of this great city.

    The culture of Dhaka is unlike any other. Visit the kite makers, jewellers, and painters to find unique pieces that you could never get elsewhere. There is also a fantastic walk regularly organized by the Urban Study Group. Their Puran Dhaka Walks are part of an Urban Heritage awareness campaign.

    Puran Dhaka Walks start in the morning and will take you through all of the best of city. You’ll spend four or five hours walking through the old city and enjoying a traditional Bangladeshi lunch while learning about the amazing history and culture of the Dhaka region.

    Generally unexplored and untouched by tourists and backpackers, Bangladesh offers amazing heritage and historical gems. A truly lush and green landscape, worth a visit.

    Nicci is a style and culture blogger. She is an avid traveller who loves literature, cinema, art, exploring and, of course, Desi culture. Her life motto is “fortune favours the bold."

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