Kurangu Pedal chosen for International Film Festival of India

Kamalakannan’s ‘Kurangu Pedal’ is one of three Tamil films selected for the International Film Festival of India.

Kurangu Pedal chosen for International Film Festival of India f

“It’s a slice of emotions and innocence of childhood"

Kamalakannan’s 2022 directorial, Kurangu Pedal, has been selected for the Indian Panorama section of the 53rd International Film Festival of India (IFFI).

It is one of three Tamil films selected.

The event will take place in Goa from November 20 to 28, 2022.

Speaking about the film, Kamalakannan said:

“When Mount Tambora, a volcano in Indonesia exploded in the 1800s, the ash covered fields, crops failed and a massive famine followed where horses and other animals could not be fed.

“It eventually led to the invention of the bicycle. We have to understand history…

“This machine’s social relevance and impact on society is huge… It’s a symbol of revolution, especially for the oppressed.”

Overjoyed with the selection, the director continued:

“This is a big achievement. The film will now do the festival circuit in Goa, Kerala and Chennai and hopefully at international film festivals too.

“To feature among the top 20 films like KGF, RRR and Jai Bhim is a great recognition for our team.”

Kurangu Pedal is based on Rasi Alagappan’s short story Cycle.

It is set during the summer of the 1980s and it tells the story of a schoolboy who wants to learn how to ride a bike but his father is unable to teach him.

Kamalakannan explained: “It’s a slice of emotions and innocence of childhood, served with nostalgia through the eyes of children. It ultimately shows what the boy gains from the experience.

“Children receive art in its purest form and they will enjoy this film.

The film is produced by Savitha Kamalakannan and Sumee Baskaran along with Sanjay Jayakumar.

Savitha said: “At the Children Film Festival, we showed films made by Iranian filmmakers like Majid Majidi, Japanese masters, Satyajit Ray, and Korean films like The Way Home.

“These films are refreshing as they teach life’s lessons using small day-to-day incidents and the emotions make an instant connection.

“We wanted to recreate a classic for children, showcasing our sensibilities.

“Most Indian films made for children show them as superheroes and have an unrealistic approach.”

Kamalakannan added: “It is our responsibility to expose them to good content.

“There is information pollution and no one can control it.

“But, children should be aware of what is right and wrong in film language, be it porn or religious fanaticism.

“Film appreciation has to be introduced, especially in the school curriculum.

“Though the Tamil Nadu Government has started screening classics at Government Schools, we still have a long way to go.”

Aarthi is an International Development student and journalist. She likes to write, read books, watch movies, travel, and click pictures. Her motto is, “Be the change you wish to see in the world